House of Lords: Assisting suicide and the discretion to prosecute revisited

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97456
Title:
House of Lords: Assisting suicide and the discretion to prosecute revisited
Authors:
Powell, D. (Dave)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Powell, D. (2009) 'House of Lords: Assisting suicide and the discretion to prosecute revisited', Journal of Criminal Law, 73 (6), pp.475-479.
Publisher:
Vathek Publishing
Journal:
Journal of Criminal Law
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97456
DOI:
10.1350/jcla.2009.73.6.601
Abstract:
Debbie Purdy suffers from multiple sclerosis. She anticipates that her condition will worsen to a point at which her continuing existence will become unbearable. At this point she will want to end her own life. She would need help to do this as she would have to travel to a jurisdiction in which assisted suicide is lawful. She would be unable to do this without the assistance of her husband who would then be liable to prosecution under the Suicide Act 1961, s. 2(1) which provides that: A person who aids, abets, counsels or procures the suicide of another, or an attempt by another to commit suicide, shall be liable on conviction on indictment to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
assisting suicide; prosecution; discretion; guidance; human rights
ISSN:
0022-0183
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 27/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 27/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPowell, D. (Dave)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-27T12:51:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-27T12:51:00Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Criminal Law; 73 (6): 475-479en
dc.identifier.issn0022-0183-
dc.identifier.doi10.1350/jcla.2009.73.6.601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/97456-
dc.description.abstractDebbie Purdy suffers from multiple sclerosis. She anticipates that her condition will worsen to a point at which her continuing existence will become unbearable. At this point she will want to end her own life. She would need help to do this as she would have to travel to a jurisdiction in which assisted suicide is lawful. She would be unable to do this without the assistance of her husband who would then be liable to prosecution under the Suicide Act 1961, s. 2(1) which provides that: A person who aids, abets, counsels or procures the suicide of another, or an attempt by another to commit suicide, shall be liable on conviction on indictment to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherVathek Publishingen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 27/04/2010]en
dc.subjectassisting suicideen
dc.subjectprosecutionen
dc.subjectdiscretionen
dc.subjectguidanceen
dc.subjecthuman rightsen
dc.titleHouse of Lords: Assisting suicide and the discretion to prosecute revisiteden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Criminal Lawen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 27/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardPowell, D. (2009) 'House of Lords: Assisting suicide and the discretion to prosecute revisited', Journal of Criminal Law, 73 (6), pp.475-479.-
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