Energy-efficiency interventions in housing: Learning from the inhabitants

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97745
Title:
Energy-efficiency interventions in housing: Learning from the inhabitants
Authors:
Crosbie, T. (Tracey); Baker, K. (Keith)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Science and Technology. Centre for Construction Innovation and Research.
Citation:
Crosbie, T. and Baker, K. (2010) 'Energy-efficiency interventions in housing: Learning from the inhabitants', Building Research & Information, 38 (1), pp.70-79.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Building Research & Information
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97745
DOI:
10.1080/09613210903279326
Abstract:
Technological solutions to domestic energy reduction are insufficient without the cooperation of inhabitants. It does not matter how much energy hypothetically could be saved by efficient technologies if no one wants to live in the properties, install or use efficient lighting and heating. Therefore, to improve the uptake and effectiveness of household energy-efficiency interventions, it is necessary to understand 'why people react to particular energy-efficiency interventions in the ways they do?' An analysis is presented of in-depth interviews with 50 inhabitants who participated in one of four domestic energy-efficiency interventions. The findings indicate that issues such as aesthetic tastes and effects on lifestyle are central to why people reject economically viable, simple and well-understood domestic energy-efficiency interventions.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
CFL bulbs; energy demand; energy efficiency; housing; inhabitants; lighting; user acceptance; user behaviour
ISSN:
0961-3218; 1466-4321
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 30/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 30/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrosbie, T. (Tracey)en
dc.contributor.authorBaker, K. (Keith)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-30T14:53:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-30T14:53:29Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.citationBuilding Research & Information; 38(1):70-79en
dc.identifier.issn0961-3218-
dc.identifier.issn1466-4321-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09613210903279326-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/97745-
dc.description.abstractTechnological solutions to domestic energy reduction are insufficient without the cooperation of inhabitants. It does not matter how much energy hypothetically could be saved by efficient technologies if no one wants to live in the properties, install or use efficient lighting and heating. Therefore, to improve the uptake and effectiveness of household energy-efficiency interventions, it is necessary to understand 'why people react to particular energy-efficiency interventions in the ways they do?' An analysis is presented of in-depth interviews with 50 inhabitants who participated in one of four domestic energy-efficiency interventions. The findings indicate that issues such as aesthetic tastes and effects on lifestyle are central to why people reject economically viable, simple and well-understood domestic energy-efficiency interventions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 30/04/2010]en
dc.subjectCFL bulbsen
dc.subjectenergy demanden
dc.subjectenergy efficiencyen
dc.subjecthousingen
dc.subjectinhabitantsen
dc.subjectlightingen
dc.subjectuser acceptanceen
dc.subjectuser behaviouren
dc.titleEnergy-efficiency interventions in housing: Learning from the inhabitantsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Science and Technology. Centre for Construction Innovation and Research.en
dc.identifier.journalBuilding Research & Informationen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 30/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardCrosbie, T. and Baker, K. (2010) 'Energy-efficiency interventions in housing: Learning from the inhabitants', Building Research & Information, 38 (1), pp.70-79.-
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