Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97950
Title:
Making laboratory measurements on a chip
Authors:
Ali, Z. (Zulfiqur); Auger, V. (Vincent); Scott, S. M. (Simon)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Science and Technology. Centre for Nano and Microsystems.
Citation:
Ali, Z., Auger, V. and Scott, S. M. (2007) 'Making laboratory measurements on a chip', Measurement and Control, 40 (3), pp.76-79.
Publisher:
Institute of Measurement & Control
Journal:
Measurement and Control
Issue Date:
Apr-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97950
Abstract:
The perspective on the development of nano and microsystems for chemical and biological measurements is presented. The use of nano and microfabrication approaches allows to create miniaturized analytical devices that are inherently smaller, have lower power consumption, give lower cost of analysis, are more reproducible and can be produced in high volumes. The behavior of fluids in microchannels is different from that under macro conditions and the channel depth or channel diameter determines the Reynolds number. The force is mechanically driven by a pump, pressure driven, centrifugal or electrically driven by a potential difference, electro-osmotic flow. Numerical simulations provide an understanding of the chemical and physical processes that take place in microfludic devices and are used in their design. The microfluidic devices are mainly used in application of proteomics analysis, interrogating cells, electrophoresis analysis, and microbiological diagnostic analysis.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
nanosystems; microsystems; measurements; computer simulation; costs; electic power utilization; microchannels; Reynolds number; microfluidics
ISSN:
0020-2940
Rights:
No publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 05/05/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 05/05/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAli, Z. (Zulfiqur)en
dc.contributor.authorAuger, V. (Vincent)en
dc.contributor.authorScott, S. M. (Simon)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-05T12:58:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-05T12:58:37Z-
dc.date.issued2007-04-
dc.identifier.citationMeasurement and Control; 40(3):76-79en
dc.identifier.issn0020-2940-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/97950-
dc.description.abstractThe perspective on the development of nano and microsystems for chemical and biological measurements is presented. The use of nano and microfabrication approaches allows to create miniaturized analytical devices that are inherently smaller, have lower power consumption, give lower cost of analysis, are more reproducible and can be produced in high volumes. The behavior of fluids in microchannels is different from that under macro conditions and the channel depth or channel diameter determines the Reynolds number. The force is mechanically driven by a pump, pressure driven, centrifugal or electrically driven by a potential difference, electro-osmotic flow. Numerical simulations provide an understanding of the chemical and physical processes that take place in microfludic devices and are used in their design. The microfluidic devices are mainly used in application of proteomics analysis, interrogating cells, electrophoresis analysis, and microbiological diagnostic analysis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Measurement & Controlen
dc.rightsNo publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 05/05/2010]en
dc.subjectnanosystemsen
dc.subjectmicrosystemsen
dc.subjectmeasurementsen
dc.subjectcomputer simulationen
dc.subjectcostsen
dc.subjectelectic power utilizationen
dc.subjectmicrochannelsen
dc.subjectReynolds numberen
dc.subjectmicrofluidicsen
dc.titleMaking laboratory measurements on a chipen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Science and Technology. Centre for Nano and Microsystems.en
dc.identifier.journalMeasurement and Controlen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 05/05/2010]en
or.citation.harvardAli, Z., Auger, V. and Scott, S. M. (2007) 'Making laboratory measurements on a chip', Measurement and Control, 40 (3), pp.76-79.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.