Evaluating a spoken dialogue system for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examination

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/98019
Title:
Evaluating a spoken dialogue system for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examination
Authors:
Barker, D. J.; van Schaik, P. (Paul) ( 0000-0001-5322-6554 ) ; Simpson, D. S.; Corbett, W. A. (William)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Computing and Mathematics.
Citation:
Barker, D. J., van Schaik, P., Simpson, D. and Corbett, W.A. (2003) 'Evaluating a spoken dialogue system for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examination', Medical informatics and the Internet in medicine, 28 (2), pp.85-97.
Journal:
Medical informatics and the Internet in medicine
Issue Date:
Jun-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/98019
DOI:
10.1080/14639230310001600452
PubMed ID:
14692586
Abstract:
Paper, keyboard or mouse-driven systems may not be suitable for data capture because of the hands-busy constraint imposed by an endoscopic examination. A Spoken Dialogue System (SDS) has a number of advantages when compared to keyboard and mouse-driven input modalities, particularly with respect to hands free and eyes-free control of a system. However, any emerging technology will never deliver improved organizational effectiveness if it is not accepted and used. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) provides a framework that helps explain the determinants of computer acceptance. This study, through the application of TAM, demonstrates a high level of user acceptance with clinicians wanting to use spoken dialogue technology for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examination. Clinicians would also prefer to use a SDS for recording endoscopy rather than use a paper-based or keyboard and mouse-driven system. Using a clinical narrative during an endoscopic examination was also perceived to be a natural way to record findings. Relationships between basic TAM variables were confirmed and relationships between quality of dialogue measures and TAM variables were established.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
health personnel; computers; automatic data processing; clinical laboratory; database management; endoscopy; Great Britain; hospitals, university; medical staff,; observation; questionnaires; research design; user-computer interface; voice; attitude; hospital; information systems; gastrointestinal; microphone
ISSN:
1463-9238
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 06/05/2010]
Citation Count:
6 [Scopus, 06/05/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBarker, D. J.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Schaik, P. (Paul)en
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, D. S.en
dc.contributor.authorCorbett, W. A. (William)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-06T09:11:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-06T09:11:46Z-
dc.date.issued2003-06-
dc.identifier.citationMedical informatics and the Internet in medicine; 28(2):85-97en
dc.identifier.issn1463-9238-
dc.identifier.pmid14692586-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14639230310001600452-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/98019-
dc.description.abstractPaper, keyboard or mouse-driven systems may not be suitable for data capture because of the hands-busy constraint imposed by an endoscopic examination. A Spoken Dialogue System (SDS) has a number of advantages when compared to keyboard and mouse-driven input modalities, particularly with respect to hands free and eyes-free control of a system. However, any emerging technology will never deliver improved organizational effectiveness if it is not accepted and used. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) provides a framework that helps explain the determinants of computer acceptance. This study, through the application of TAM, demonstrates a high level of user acceptance with clinicians wanting to use spoken dialogue technology for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examination. Clinicians would also prefer to use a SDS for recording endoscopy rather than use a paper-based or keyboard and mouse-driven system. Using a clinical narrative during an endoscopic examination was also perceived to be a natural way to record findings. Relationships between basic TAM variables were confirmed and relationships between quality of dialogue measures and TAM variables were established.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 06/05/2010]en
dc.subjecthealth personnelen
dc.subjectcomputersen
dc.subjectautomatic data processingen
dc.subjectclinical laboratoryen
dc.subjectdatabase managementen
dc.subjectendoscopyen
dc.subjectGreat Britainen
dc.subjecthospitals, universityen
dc.subjectmedical staff,en
dc.subjectobservationen
dc.subjectquestionnairesen
dc.subjectresearch designen
dc.subjectuser-computer interfaceen
dc.subjectvoiceen
dc.subjectattitudeen
dc.subjecthospitalen
dc.subjectinformation systemsen
dc.subjectgastrointestinalen
dc.subjectmicrophoneen
dc.titleEvaluating a spoken dialogue system for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examinationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Computing and Mathematics.en
dc.identifier.journalMedical informatics and the Internet in medicineen
ref.citationcount6 [Scopus, 06/05/2010]en
or.citation.harvardBarker, D. J., van Schaik, P., Simpson, D. and Corbett, W.A. (2003) 'Evaluating a spoken dialogue system for recording clinical observations during an endoscopic examination', Medical informatics and the Internet in medicine, 28 (2), pp.85-97.en

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