16S rDNA-based characterization of BTX-catabolizing microbial associations isolated from a South African sandy soil

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/99078
Title:
16S rDNA-based characterization of BTX-catabolizing microbial associations isolated from a South African sandy soil
Authors:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang); Röling, W. F. M. (Wilfred); Braster, M. (Martin); Senior, E. (Eric); van Verseveld, H. W. (Henk)
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit. Department of Molecular Cell Physiology.
Citation:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. et. al. (2000) '16S rDNA-based characterization of BTX-catabolizing microbial associations isolated from a South African sandy soil', Biodegradation, 11 (6), pp.351-357.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
Biodegradation
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/99078
DOI:
10.1023/A:1011611231633
Abstract:
In the presence of different selection pressures, particularly pH and electron donor concentration, indigenous microbial associations which catabolize selected petroleum hydrocarbon components (benzene, toluene and o-, m- and p-xylene (BTX)) were enriched and isolated from a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated KwaZulu-Natal sandy soil. Electron microscopy revealed that, numerically, rods constituted the majority of the populations responsible for BTX catabolism. Molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 16S rDNA fingerprinting by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)) were employed to explore the diversities and analyze the structures of the isolated microbial associations. Pearson product-moment correlation indicated that the different, but chemically similar, petroleum hydrocarbon molecules, effected the isolation of different associations. However, some similar numerically-dominant bands characterized the associations. A 30% similarity was evident between the m- and o-xylene-catabolizing associations regardless of the molecule concentration and the enrichment pH. PCR-DGGE was also used to complement conventional culture-based microbiological procedures for environmental parameter optimization. Band pattern differences indicated profile variations of the isolated associations which possibly accounted for the growth rate changes recorded in response to pH and temperature perturbations.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
BTX; environmental parameter variations; microbial profiles; PCR-DGGE
ISSN:
0923-9820
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 18/05/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRalebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang)en
dc.contributor.authorRöling, W. F. M. (Wilfred)en
dc.contributor.authorBraster, M. (Martin)en
dc.contributor.authorSenior, E. (Eric)en
dc.contributor.authorvan Verseveld, H. W. (Henk)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18T09:07:30Zen
dc.date.available2010-05-18T09:07:30Zen
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.identifier.citationBiodegradation;11(6):351-357en
dc.identifier.issn0923-9820en
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1011611231633en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/99078en
dc.description.abstractIn the presence of different selection pressures, particularly pH and electron donor concentration, indigenous microbial associations which catabolize selected petroleum hydrocarbon components (benzene, toluene and o-, m- and p-xylene (BTX)) were enriched and isolated from a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated KwaZulu-Natal sandy soil. Electron microscopy revealed that, numerically, rods constituted the majority of the populations responsible for BTX catabolism. Molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 16S rDNA fingerprinting by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)) were employed to explore the diversities and analyze the structures of the isolated microbial associations. Pearson product-moment correlation indicated that the different, but chemically similar, petroleum hydrocarbon molecules, effected the isolation of different associations. However, some similar numerically-dominant bands characterized the associations. A 30% similarity was evident between the m- and o-xylene-catabolizing associations regardless of the molecule concentration and the enrichment pH. PCR-DGGE was also used to complement conventional culture-based microbiological procedures for environmental parameter optimization. Band pattern differences indicated profile variations of the isolated associations which possibly accounted for the growth rate changes recorded in response to pH and temperature perturbations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 18/05/2010]en
dc.subjectBTXen
dc.subjectenvironmental parameter variationsen
dc.subjectmicrobial profilesen
dc.subjectPCR-DGGEen
dc.title16S rDNA-based characterization of BTX-catabolizing microbial associations isolated from a South African sandy soilen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentVrije Universiteit. Department of Molecular Cell Physiology.en
dc.identifier.journalBiodegradationen
or.citation.harvardRalebitso-Senior, T. K. et. al. (2000) '16S rDNA-based characterization of BTX-catabolizing microbial associations isolated from a South African sandy soil', Biodegradation, 11 (6), pp.351-357.en
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