Supply and demand: The shifting expectations of forensic anthropology in the United Kingdom

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/99317
Title:
Supply and demand: The shifting expectations of forensic anthropology in the United Kingdom
Authors:
Thompson, T. J. U. (Tim)
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield. Medico-Legal Centre. Department of Forensic Pathology.
Citation:
Thompson, T. J. U. (2003) 'Supply and demand: The shifting expectations of forensic anthropology in the United Kingdom', Science and Justice, 43 (4), pp.183-186.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Science and Justice
Issue Date:
Oct-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/99317
DOI:
10.1016/S1355-0306(03)71774-2
Abstract:
Forensic anthropology is a relatively young discipline in the United Kingdom. Practitioners utilise techniques devised and adapted within the field of biological anthropology and attempt to contribute towards the identification of deceased individuals within the forensic context. Traditionally this means the examination of the human skeleton in an attempt to either create biological boundaries of the deceased thus reducing the number of potential identifications, or to compare the remains with ante-mortem records to positively identify the deceased. Usually an osteological profile is generated containing estimates of biological sex, age at death and stature and information on pathologies and traumas. Current diversification and pioneering research within the field of forensic anthropology now means that forensic anthropologists can contribute towards the idenification of living individuals with the use of such methods as facial rcognition, ear mark identification and DNA analysis. In the UK its origins lie mainly in the field of archaeology.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
forensic science; forensic anthropology; United Kingdom; training
ISSN:
1355-0306
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Accessed 19/05/2010]
Citation Count:
2 [Scopus, 19/05/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThompson, T. J. U. (Tim)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-19T13:10:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-19T13:10:58Z-
dc.date.issued2003-10-
dc.identifier.citationScience and Justice; 43(4):183-186en
dc.identifier.issn1355-0306-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1355-0306(03)71774-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/99317-
dc.description.abstractForensic anthropology is a relatively young discipline in the United Kingdom. Practitioners utilise techniques devised and adapted within the field of biological anthropology and attempt to contribute towards the identification of deceased individuals within the forensic context. Traditionally this means the examination of the human skeleton in an attempt to either create biological boundaries of the deceased thus reducing the number of potential identifications, or to compare the remains with ante-mortem records to positively identify the deceased. Usually an osteological profile is generated containing estimates of biological sex, age at death and stature and information on pathologies and traumas. Current diversification and pioneering research within the field of forensic anthropology now means that forensic anthropologists can contribute towards the idenification of living individuals with the use of such methods as facial rcognition, ear mark identification and DNA analysis. In the UK its origins lie mainly in the field of archaeology.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Accessed 19/05/2010]en
dc.subjectforensic scienceen
dc.subjectforensic anthropologyen
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen
dc.subjecttrainingen
dc.titleSupply and demand: The shifting expectations of forensic anthropology in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffield. Medico-Legal Centre. Department of Forensic Pathology.en
dc.identifier.journalScience and Justiceen
ref.citationcount2 [Scopus, 19/05/2010]en
or.citation.harvardThompson, T. J. U. (2003) 'Supply and demand: The shifting expectations of forensic anthropology in the United Kingdom', Science and Justice, 43 (4), pp.183-186.-
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